Working with OmniFocus

Joe Buhlig has, with his vast experience in using OmniFocus, put together a comprehensive and complete set of guides for getting the most value out of OmniFocus and GTD in a series of well-produced videos in a course called Working with OmniFocus. Everything from the basic setup to explaining an advanced workflow is thoroughly covered in an easily digestible video format.

Using Joe’s system and his down-to-earth way of describing his setup and workflow, these guides provide a solid foundation from which to build your very own productivity setup in OmniFocus. It’s a solid investment for becoming a master of productivity and efficiency, and it will take your life to the next level.

Check out Working with OmniFocus.

The 2016 OmniFocus Setup and Workflow

I have written countless posts on OmniFocus and the Getting Things Done methodology, but this is the very first time I have gathered my entire workflow and setup into a single piece. Since my GTD setup is an ever evolving organism, this can only be seen as snapshot in time for when this article is written, and the real changes will be visible when I write the 2017 edition of this very post and highlight the differences. Continue reading

Do your own work first

Andrew Merle writes about how to make sure that your projects are progressing, instead of just focusing on the urgent but not so important tasks.

I stopped checking my email first thing in the morning several years ago after reading Tim Ferriss’ The 4-Hour Workweek. He said that one simple change would be a life-changer, and it has been for me.

The reason why it works is because it enables proactive work first, reactive work second.

Even when we have clear top priorities for the day, checking email first thing can easily derail those plans by compelling us to react and respond to other people’s “urgent” needs. And before you know it, the day has been totally eaten up, and our energy drained, before we can get started on our own projects.

This made me think about the daily review in GTD, and that instead of doing it first thing in the morning, do it by the end of the day instead. By then, you usually know what to focus on during the next day, and deciding there and then removes the friction of getting started early the next day.

via Why You Should Do Your Work First, Others’ Work Second

Referencing external tasks in OmniFocus

Getting Things Done provides an excellent framework for managing all aspects of your life. What could easily happen in a professional work environment though, is that there is already an existing tool in place to keep track of tasks for the entire team, be it Trello, Pivotal Tracker or some other collaboration tool. While it is certainly possible to keep track of some tasks in separate systems, there will usually be an uncertainty in what goes where and if everything has been captured and taken care of appropriately. The worst thing that could happen, and usually does, is that you lose trust in the system and things fall through the cracks because you missed to check one system.

Continue reading

A modern approach to contexts and perspectives in OmniFocus

Ever since the book Getting Things Done was released and the notion of separating actions in projects into contexts was first introduced, people have been trying to customize, and improve the effectiveness of their definition ever since. Being an OmniFocus user for quite a while, I naturally started out with the classic contexts that David Allen himself outlined in the book, such as “at office” and “at computer”. Times have however changed considerably since the beginning of 2000 when the book was first published, and certain context stopped making sense as the years went by.

Continue reading