Using Ulysses as my writing platform

ulysses

I have gone through a decent number of text editors geared towards writing, and while most of them have been quite workable and even pleasant, there has always been something missing. My demands are fairly simple, and the gist is to focus on the writing experience and not having to deal with minutiae, like saving revisions and naming files. Continue reading

Airmail – the email powerhouse

Airmail is an email powerhouse with a serious set of features to accommodate every possible way of working with email. It is available for both the Mac as well as the iPhone and iPad, which means that you will get a unified experience regardless which platform you use. Continue reading

iOS is growing up

As I was recently writing something on my iPad using a Bluetooth keyboard, I realized that I am actually starting to feel right at home using it as a real computer. The tipping point was the cmd+tab app switcher, which feels like the most natural thing in the world1, and finally makes app switching effortless and almost to the point of being joyful. Continue reading

What’s missing in iOS email apps

After having tried nearly all email apps under the sun and never feeling properly satisfied with the functionality, I have naturally become a bit frustrated by the lack of options. There must surely be an email app available which fulfills my need of making sure that nothing slips between the cracks while waiting for responses. Continue reading

Google Nik Collection

Google has dropped the price for the versatile Nik Collection from $500 to free. It consists of a couple of different applications which can be used together with Lightroom or Photoshot, and the Silver Efex Pro package is probably their most famous, producing stunning black and white photos.

Photo enthusiasts all over the world use the Nik Collection to get the best out of their images every day. As we continue to focus our long-term investments in building incredible photo editing tools for mobile, including Google Photos and Snapseed, we’ve decided to make the Nik Collection desktop suite available for free, so that now anyone can use it.

The Nik Collection is comprised of seven desktop plug-ins that provide a powerful range of photo editing capabilities — from filter applications that improve color correction, to retouching and creative effects, to image sharpening that brings out all the hidden details, to the ability to make adjustments to the color and tonality of images.

Starting March 24, 2016, the latest Nik Collection will be freely available to download: Analog Efex Pro, Color Efex Pro, Silver Efex Pro, Viveza, HDR Efex Pro, Sharpener Pro and Dfine. If you purchased the Nik Collection in 2016, you will receive a full refund, which we’ll automatically issue back to you in the coming days.

We’re excited to bring the powerful photo editing tools once only used by professionals to even more people now.

I just can’t stop wondering that happens next. Either it’s a move to attract more users to the apps, or they could be on the verge of killing off the software.

If you’re into photography, definitely download it and start tinkering with your photos.

Source: Google Nik Collection

The 2016 OmniFocus Setup and Workflow

Startup Stock Photos

I have written countless posts on OmniFocus and the Getting Things Done methodology, but this is the very first time I have gathered my entire workflow and setup into a single piece. Since my GTD setup is an ever evolving organism, this can only be seen as snapshot in time for when this article is written, and the real changes will be visible when I write the 2017 edition of this very post and highlight the differences. Continue reading

Buffer Ditching the Office Completely

Buffer have shut down their office in favor of just doing remote work.

How do we work now? Pretty much the same way we did before: All around the world, from homes, coffee shops and coworking spaces. Those in San Francisco who worked in the office now have moved into coworking spaces, which Buffer pays for as part of our team perks. We’ve also opened up some discussion about paying for a monthly coffee shop allowance for teammates who prefer that environment to a true coworking space.

If there is a remote working culture and that there are tool and practices that support this kind of work, it’s probably a lot better letting everyone decide where they feel the most productive. Just cramming all employees together in an open office space for the sake of control1 just isn’t necessary anymore.

Source: We’re Ditching the Office Completely: Here’s Why


  1. With control, I mean the illusion of control. Is it worth sacrificing productivity for local presence?